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GREat Medway Talk – How head injuries may lead to Alzheimer’s Disease

March 2 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

How head injuries may lead to Alzheimer’s disease by Dr Romina Vuono on Wednesday 2nd March 2022

Summary:

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a sudden damage to the brain caused by an external force (blow or jolt) to the head.  Each year, millions worldwide and about 1.4 million in England and Wales alone suffer TBI in road accidents, collision sports and falls.  Worry about longer-term effects of TBI has increased recently with media coverage of repeated head injury in sport which leads to behavioural problems and dementia. In this talk, Romina will show the brain functions, why head injuries could lead to dementia and discuss research which may help understand the mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s Disease and lead to the discovery of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Biography:

Dr Romina Vuono was appointed Lecturer in Biological Sciences with speciality in Neurosciences and Brain Diseases at the Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent, in 2019.  She also holds an Honorary Research Associate position at the University of Cambridge.  Since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, she is supporting the NHS with the SARS-CoV-2 testing and received funding to investigate genetic factors increasing the risk of developing severe Covid-19.

This FREE talk is delivered by the Faculty of Engineering & Science at the University of Greenwich at Medway.  It will be held in the Ward Room, Pembroke Building on the Medway Campus at 6 pm.  It will be delivered in accordance with Government Covid-19 guidelines with consideration to social distancing and the wearing of face masks.  Attendance is by registration by emailing or by calling 01634 883495.  There is free parking on the campus after 5 pm.

 

Details

Date:
March 2
Time:
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Organiser

University of Greenwich
Phone:
01634 883495
Email:
View Organiser Website
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